BI Polar

Quick Tip: Creating “data workspaces” for dataflows and shared datasets

Power BI is constantly evolving – there’s a new version of Power BI Desktop every month, and the Power BI service is updated every week. Many of the new capabilities in Power BI represent gradual refinements, but some are significant enough to make you rethink how you your organization uses Power BI.

Power BI dataflows and the new shared and certified datasets[1] fall into the latter category. Both of these capabilities enable sharing data across workspace boundaries. When building a data model in Power BI Desktop you can connect to entities from dataflows in multiple workspaces, and publish the dataset you create into a different workspace altogether. With shared datasets you can create reports and dashboards in one workspace using a dataset in another[2].

The ability to have a single data resource – dataflow or dataset – shared across workspaces is a significant change in how the Power BI service has traditionally worked. Before these new capabilities, each workspace was largely self-contained. Dashboards could only get data from a dataset in the same workspace, and the tables in the dataset each contained the queries that extracted, transformed, and loaded their data. This workspace-centric design encouraged[3] approaches where assets were grouped into workspaces because of the platform, and not because it was the best way to meet the business requirements.

Now that we’re no longer bound by these constraints, it’s time to start thinking about having workspaces in Power BI whose function is to contain data artifacts (dataflows and/or datasets) that are used by visualization artifacts (dashboards and reports) in other workspaces. It’s time to start thinking about approaches that may look something like this:

Please keep in mind these two things when looking at the diagram:

  1. This is an arbitrary collection of boxes and arrows that illustrate a concept, and not a reference architecture.
  2. I do not have any formal art training.

Partitioning workspaces in this way encourages reuse and can reduce redundancy. It can also help enable greater separation of duties during development and maintenance of Power BI solutions. If you have one team that is responsible for making data available, and another team that is responsible for visualizing and presenting that data to solve business problems[4], this approach can given each team a natural space for its work. Work space. Workspace. Yeah.

Many of the large enterprise customers I work with are already evaluating or adopting this approach. Like any big change it’s safer to approach this effort incrementally. The customers I’ve spoken to are planning to apply this pattern to new solutions before they think about retrofitting any existing solutions.

Once you’ve had a chance to see how these new capabilities can change how your teams work with Power BI, I’d love to hear what you think.

Edit 2019-06-26: Adam Saxton from Guy In A Cube has published a video on Shared and Certified datasets. If you want another perspective on how this works, you should watch it.


[1] Currently in preview: blog | docs.

[2] If you’re wondering how these capabilities for data reuse relate to each other, you may want to check out this older post, as the post you’re currently reading won’t go into this topic: Lego Bricks and the Spectrum of Data Enrichment and Reuse.

[3] And in some cases, required.

[4] If you don’t, you probably want to think about it. This isn’t the only pattern for successful adoption of Power BI at scale, but it is a very common and tested pattern.