BI is dead. Long live BI!

As I was riding the bus home from jury duty the other day[1] I saw this tweet come in from Eric Vogelpohl.

 

There’s a lot to unpack here. and I don’t expect to do it all justice in this post, but Eric’s thought-provoking tweet made me want to reply, and I knew it wouldn’t fit into 280 characters… but I can tackle some of the more important and interesting elements.

First and foremost, Eric tags me before he tags Marco, Chris, or Curbal. I am officially number one, and I will never let Marco or Chris forget it[2].

With that massive ego boost out of the way, let’s get to the BI, which is definitely dead. And also definitely not dead.

Eric’s post starts off with a bold and simple assertion: If you have the reactive/historical insights you need today, you have enough business intelligence and should focus on other things instead. I’m paraphrasing, but I believe this effectively captures the essence of his claim. Let me pick apart some of the assumptions I believe underlie this assertion.

First, this claim seems to assume that all organizations are “good w/ BI.” Although this may be true of an increasing number of mature companies, in my experience it is definitely not something that can be taken for granted. The alignment of business and technology, and the cultural changes required to initiate and maintain this alignment, are not yet ubiquitous.

Should they be? Should we be able to take for granted that in 2019 companies have all the BI they need? [3]

The second major assumption behind Eric’s first point seems to be that “good w/ BI” today translates to “good w/ BI” tomorrow… as if BI capabilities are a blanket solution rather than something scoped and constrained to a specific set of business and data domains. In reality[4], BI capabilities are developed and deployed incrementally based on priorities and constraints, and are then maintained and extended as the priorities and constraints evolve over time.

My job gives me the opportunity to work with large enterprise companies to help them succeed in their efforts related to data, business intelligence, and analytics. Many of these companies have built successful BI architectures and are reaping the benefits of their work. These companies may well be characterized as being “good w/ BI” but none of them are resting on their laurels – they are instead looking for ways to extend the scope of their BI investments, and to optimize what they have.

I don’t believe BI is going anywhere in the near future. Not only are most companies not “good w/ BI” today, the concept of being “good w/ BI” simply doesn’t make sense in the context in which BI exists. So long as business requirements and environments change over time, and so long as businesses need to understand and react, there will be a continuing need for BI. Being “good w/ BI” isn’t a meaningful concept beyond a specific point in time… and time never slows down.

If your refrigerator is stocked with what your family likes to eat, are you “good w/ food”? This may be the case today, but what about when your children become teenagers and eat more? What about when someone in the family develops food allergies? What about when one of your children goes vegan? What about when the kids go off to college? Although this analogy won’t hold up to close inspection[5] it hopefully shows how difficult it is to be “good” over the long term, even for a well-understood problem domain, when faced with easily foreseeable changes over time.

Does any of this mean that BI represents the full set of capabilities that successful organizations need? Definitely not. More and more, BI is becoming “table stakes” for businesses. Without BI it’s becoming more difficult for companies to simply survive, and BI is no longer a true differentiator that assures a competitive advantage. For that advantage, companies need to look at other ways to get value from their data, including predictive and prescriptive analytics, and the development of a data culture that empowers and encourages more people to do more things with more data in the execution of their duties.

And of course, this may well have been Eric’s point from the beginning…

 


[1] I’ve been serving on the jury for a moderately complex civil trial for most of August, and because the trial is in downtown Seattle during business hours I have been working early mornings and evenings in the office, and taking the bus to the courthouse to avoid the traffic and parking woes that plague Seattle. I am very, very tired.

[2] Please remind me to add “thought leader” to my LinkedIn profile. Also maybe something about blockchain.

[3] I’ll leave this as an exercise for the reader.

[4] At least in my reality. Your mileage may vary.

[5] Did this analogy hold up to even distant observation?

3 thoughts on “BI is dead. Long live BI!

  1. Marcus Early

    As a member of one of those large organizations, I agree its an ever evolving need. Turnover and changes of leadership have BI solutions an ever moving target.

    I firmly believe that that the lines between #1 and #2 in the original tweet are going to continue to blur with UI put in place to help apply ML and AI for the common user. Which sort of takes away from the sensationalism of “BI is dead!”.

    Like

  2. Jack Regehr

    Often when I read that ‘Such and such is dead’ I get the impression that what it really means is ‘This technology or thing has gone out of fashion for my colleagues & I.’ I believe there is way more variety (and complexity) than we realize.

    Like

  3. I am totally a fan of the fridge metaphor… And most of the time, something is even rotten in the kingdom of Data…Of course, we all are in the magnificent fantasy of the perfect data world–where BI will be useless. We may think that we are the knights of a data kingdom in our shining armor, at best we are the janitors of the Augeas stable. And, I am very proud of this crappy part of the job. We bring coherence and consistency in companies. Almost all of the BI project I was a part of, helped the operational data to be cleaner and to fix their original flaws. It is an underestimated effect of it. The bright side is not always in the obvious part…

    Like

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