Data culture and the centerline

I’m running behind on my own YouTube publishing duties[1], but that doesn’t keep me from watching[2] the occasional data culture YouTube video produced by others.

Like this one:

Ok… you may be confused. You may believe this video is not actually about data culture. This is an easy mistake to make, and you can be forgiven for making it, but the content of the video make its true subject very clear:

A new technology is introduced that changes the way people work and live. This new technology replaces existing and established technologies; it lets people do what they used to do in a new way – easier, faster, and further. It also lets people do things they couldn’t do before, and opens up new horizons of possibility.

The technology also brings risk and challenge. Some of this is because of the new capabilities, and some is because of the collision[3] between the new way and the old way of doing things. The old way and the new way aren’t completely compatible, but they use shared resources and sometimes things go wrong.

At the root of these challenges is users moving faster than any relevant authorities. Increasing numbers of people are seeing the value of the new technology, assuming the inherent risk[4], and embracing its capabilities while hoping for the best.

Different groups see the rising costs and devise solutions for these challenges. Some solutions are tactical, some are strategic. And eventually some champions emerge to push for the creation of standard solutions. Or standards plural, because there always seems to be more than one of those darned things.

Not everyone buys into the standards at first, but over time the standards are refined and… actually standardized.

This process doesn’t slow down the technology adoption. The process and the standards instead provide the necessary shape and structure for adoption to take place as safely as possible.

With the passage of time, users take for granted the safety standards as much as they take for granted the capabilities of the technology… and can’t imagine using one without the other.

For the life of me I can’t imagine why they kept doubling down on the “lane markings” analogy, but I’m actually happy they did. This approach may get more people paying attention – I can’t find any other data culture videos on YouTube with 488K views…

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[1] Part of this is because my wife has been out of town, and my increased parental responsibilities have reduced the free time I would normally spend filming and editing… but it’s mainly because I’m finding that talking coherently about data culture is harder for me than writing about data culture. I’ll get better, I assume. I hope.

[2] In this case, I watched while I was folding laundry. As one does.

[3] Yes, pun intended. No, I’m not sorry.

[4] Either through knowledge or through ignorance.

6 thoughts on “Data culture and the centerline

  1. Digression — Good to see that you are folding laundry.. I hope it is not because your wife is away… ^^ —> I hereby illustrate the concept of “the wise man show the moon , the fool looks the finger”. As a solo mother I still ask myself how we manage to achieve something in the community 😀

    I do like the post though and please keep mixing real life and technical !!! It works!

    Like

    1. Laundry is part of my weekly routine, not just because the wife was away. As is cooking, and cleaning, and so on.

      She consistently does the plumbing and electrical, I consistently do the computers and networking.

      Like

  2. Pingback: Sometimes culture is life or death – BI Polar

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