Think before you GIF

Animated GIF images are an inescapable part of our online experiences, and more and more tools make it easier and easier to include them in our written communication. Sometimes this can be a good thing.

Sometimes. Not all times.

Before you include a GIF image – especially one that flashes or blinks or strobes – in your next chat message, please pause to consider the impact that this may have on the recipients.

burnout-3721062_640

Before you include a GIF, ask yourself:

  • How many people will see this – is this a 1:1 chat, or is it a large group?
  • Does the GIF include flashing, strobing, blinking, fast-moving images?
  • Do any of the people who will see the GIF have photosensitive conditions like seizures or migraines?
  • Are you sure?
  • Does the software tool you’re using allow users to disable GIF autoplay?

I include this last point because Microsoft Teams does not provide any option to disable GIF autoplay. Seriously – even tough the UserVoice forum for Teams says that this was done in 2017, the Teams UX today does not provide any option for users to prevent GIFs from playing for them.

So if you are on a Teams meeting with 100 people and you post a GIF, everyone sees it. And odds are, that GIF you posted will mean that someone on the call will need to leave the call, or close the chat, or maybe end up in a dark room in pain for the rest of the day.

So please think before you GIF.

One thought on “Think before you GIF

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s