Simplifying the solution domain

My recent posts have focused on the importance of understanding both the problem domain and solution domain in which you’re working, the value of operating in both the problem domain and the solution domain, and some specific resources and techniques for solution-oriented practitioners to increase their fluency in understanding the problem domain. A lot of the message I’ve been trying to get across in these posts can be summarized as “the problem domain is really important, and we need to get better at appreciating and understanding the problems we work to solve.”

This message is predicated on two basic assumptions:

  1. You, the reader, are a technical professional of some sort[1], and you need to deliver technical solutions to people with problems
  2. The people who have problems can’t solve those problems on their own

Let’s look more closely at that second assumption, because it’s becoming increasingly less valid, and less true. And let’s look at it through the lens of… furniture.

Close your eyes and imagine for a moment that you need a table. Let’s say you need a bedside table. What do you do?

As you read through this list you were probably evaluating each option against your own requirements and preferences. Odds are you’ve chosen one or more options at some point in your life. Odds are the criteria you used to decide which options are viable or preferable have changed as your circumstances, skills, and budget have changed.

I couldn’t find Ikea instructions for a bedside table, but honestly I didn’t try very hard

Of course, the decision doesn’t need to be about a bedside table. It could be about a dining room table, or a bed, or a full set of kitchen cabinets. Each option will have different but similar choices, and you’ll likely use different criteria to evaluate and select the choice that’s right for you.

This is also true if the choice is about business intelligence solutions, which may not technically be considered furniture[2]. Close your eyes once more and imagine for a moment that you need a report, which may or may not include a table.  What do you do?

  • You could use an existing report
  • You could start with an existing report and customize it
  • You could start with an existing dataset use it to build a new report
  • You could start with an existing dataset, customize it using a composite model, and use it to build a new report
  • You could work with a center of excellence or BI team to create a dataset, customize a dataset, create a report, or customize a report to meet your needs
  • You could locate or create data sources and build a custom BI solution end-to-end, maybe getting some help along the way if you don’t already have the tools and expertise required for the project

The parallels are easy to see, and they hold up surprisingly well to closer inspection. Just as ready-to-build options make it possible for someone with no woodworking or cabinetry skills[3] to self-serve their own furniture, DIY BI tools[4] like Power BI make it increasingly easy for someone with no data preparation or data modeling skills to build their own BI solutions.

To step away from the furniture analogy, tools like Power BI simplify the solution domain and make it easy for problem domain experts to solve their own problems without needing to become true experts in the solution domain.

Any finance or supply chain professional can use Power BI Desktop to build reports that do what they need, without needing to ask for help. Their reports may not be the most beautiful or best optimized[5],  but maybe they don’t need to be. Maybe “good enough” is actually good enough. Just as it might make more sense to buy a $40 Ikea bedside table instead of spending hundreds or thousands of dollars on something fancier, it might make sense to stack a few milk cartons on top of each other and call it good, at least until you can save up for something better[6]. There is no one size that fits all.

If you are a Power BI professional, it may be difficult to think of the “boards and cinderblocks bookshelf” approach as acceptable, but in most circumstances it’s not up to you to decide. The tools for DIY BI are widely and freely available, and people will use them if they present the most attractive and accessible option to solve their problems. You can’t stop them from building DIY solutions, but you can help them build better ones.

This is where having an effective and engaged center of excellence comes in. Whether you think in terms of problem and solution domains, or in terms of enabling DIY through readily available tools and guidance[7], you can help make “good enough” better by meeting your problem domain experts where they are. They have the tools they need to get started building their own solutions, but they probably need your expertise and assistance to achieve their full potential.

You should help them.


[1] Probably a Power BI practitioner, but who knows?

[2] I have repeatedly seen Power BI referred to as a “platform” which is basically the same thing as a table, so I’m going to withhold judgment on this one.

[3] Someone like me! I married a carpenter and have never found the motivation to develop these skills myself.

[4] DIY BI has a ring to it that SSBI doesn’t have. Why don’t we start using DIY BI instead. DBIY? D(B)IY? D(BI)Y? Hmmm…

[5] They may indeed be the Power BI versions of my DIY home improvement projects.

[6] Please raise your hand if you too had bookshelves made of random boards and cinderblocks when you were in college, and were also happy with the results.

[7] This is the second place in this post where I’ve shared a link to this Marketplace story. If you run a Power BI COE for your organization, do yourself a favor and listen to the story – it will inspire you to think about your COE in different ways.

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