The Unplanned Career

If you’ve worked in tech for 25 years, you’ve seen some stuff, and you’ve learned a lesson or two. On October 1st, I presented a new session at Data Saturday Atlanta, sharing the story of my unplanned career, and some of the lessons I’ve learned along the way. This was the first time I presented this very personal session; and I’m incredibly grateful for the full crowd that attended, and for their feedback after the session.

My primary goal for the session is to show that you don’t need a computer science degree to build a successful career in tech – and that our industry needs more people from more non-traditional backgrounds.

My secondary goal for the session is to share some of the sharp edges that are typically hidden when people talk about their careers. Everyone wants to share their highlights, but sharing your own pain and failures is harder. This is important, because too often we’re each comparing our own blooper reel against everyone else’s highlights… and nothing good comes from that.

The Data Saturday event was in-person only[1], but I’d had a bunch of people mention they wanted to attend, but couldn’t make it to Atlanta. So…I packed a camera and microphone and recorded the video on my own.

If you weren’t able to attend, please check out the recording, and please let me know what you think!


[1] Please understand that there is no criticism implied here. Organizing a hybrid event is significantly more difficult than organizing an in-person or online-only event, and focusing on in-person community produced wonderful results.

Join me in London for SQLBits – March 8 through March 12

In less than two months I’ll be making my first work trip in over two years, flying to London to present, meet with customers, and learn exciting things at the 2022 SQLBits conference. If you can, you should register today and join me.

Here’s what I expect my week to look like:

  • Wednesday March 9, 09:00 to 17:00: I’ll be back on stage for The Day After Dashboard in a Day pre-conference learning day, co-presenting with Patrick LeBlanc, Alex Powers, and Lars Andersen.
  • Thursday March 10, 14:10 to 15:00: I’ll be joining SQLBits organizer and MVP Simon Sabin for the Maximising everyone’s super powers panel discussion on mental health.
  • Thursday March 10, 18:15 to 19:05: Prathy K from the London Power BI User Group has organized an evening “ask me anything” open Q&A session with a bunch of folks from the Power BI CAT team, which sounds like a perfect way to end the day. You can register for this evening meetup here.
  • Friday March 11, 13:40 to 14:00: I finally get to present on Roche’s Maxim of Data Transformation for a live, in-person audience, and I get 20 minutes to do it!
  • Friday March 11, 14:10 to 15:00: The BI Power Hour returns after a two-year pandemic hiatus, guaranteeing laughs and excitement[1] in a demo- and joke-filled exploration of how not to use Microsoft data technologies in the workplace. I’ll be joined by an international star-studded cast from the Power BI CAT team and the Microsoft data community, and I expect this session to be the can’t miss event of the decade.[2]
  • Saturday March 12, 08:00 to 08:50: I kick off the final day of the conference with Unleashing your personal superpower, an honest and sometimes-painful look at how to succeed in tech, despite your brain’s best efforts to stop you. I’m very excited to have this important session scheduled on the free-to-the-public day of the conference.

When I’m not on stage, I’m hoping to spend as much time as possible at the Microsoft product booth and the community zone. Conferences like SQLBits are an opportunity to have interesting conversations that can be an awkward fit for virtual channels, and I plan to get the most from my week as possible.

Update February 10: I’m planning to be in the community zone on Thursday afternoon immediately following the mental health panel discussion so we can keep that conversation going. I’m also planning to be back on Friday morning at 10:10 to talk about non-traditional career paths. If either of these conversations sounds interesting to you, you should plan on joining me.

Update February 12: My Saturday session has been moved from the end of the day to the beginning of the day. With this change, I can now have more time to hang out in the community zone on Saturday to continue the discussion.

If you’re in the London area – or if you can get there – and if attending an in-person event matches your personal risk profile, I hope you’ll register today and come say hi during the event. I’ll be the purple-haired guy with the mask on.

If you can’t come to London, I hope you’ll still register and attend. Most sessions are hybrid with virtual attendees welcome and included.


[1] Not guaranteeing that you will laugh or be excited. I’m just thinking about me here.

[2] Thinking back on the decade in question, this isn’t as high a bar as it might otherwise seem.

Simplifying the solution domain

My recent posts have focused on the importance of understanding both the problem domain and solution domain in which you’re working, the value of operating in both the problem domain and the solution domain, and some specific resources and techniques for solution-oriented practitioners to increase their fluency in understanding the problem domain. A lot of the message I’ve been trying to get across in these posts can be summarized as “the problem domain is really important, and we need to get better at appreciating and understanding the problems we work to solve.”

This message is predicated on two basic assumptions:

  1. You, the reader, are a technical professional of some sort[1], and you need to deliver technical solutions to people with problems
  2. The people who have problems can’t solve those problems on their own

Let’s look more closely at that second assumption, because it’s becoming increasingly less valid, and less true. And let’s look at it through the lens of… furniture.

Close your eyes and imagine for a moment that you need a table. Let’s say you need a bedside table. What do you do?

As you read through this list you were probably evaluating each option against your own requirements and preferences. Odds are you’ve chosen one or more options at some point in your life. Odds are the criteria you used to decide which options are viable or preferable have changed as your circumstances, skills, and budget have changed.

I couldn’t find Ikea instructions for a bedside table, but honestly I didn’t try very hard

Of course, the decision doesn’t need to be about a bedside table. It could be about a dining room table, or a bed, or a full set of kitchen cabinets. Each option will have different but similar choices, and you’ll likely use different criteria to evaluate and select the choice that’s right for you.

This is also true if the choice is about business intelligence solutions, which may not technically be considered furniture[2]. Close your eyes once more and imagine for a moment that you need a report, which may or may not include a table.  What do you do?

  • You could use an existing report
  • You could start with an existing report and customize it
  • You could start with an existing dataset use it to build a new report
  • You could start with an existing dataset, customize it using a composite model, and use it to build a new report
  • You could work with a center of excellence or BI team to create a dataset, customize a dataset, create a report, or customize a report to meet your needs
  • You could locate or create data sources and build a custom BI solution end-to-end, maybe getting some help along the way if you don’t already have the tools and expertise required for the project

The parallels are easy to see, and they hold up surprisingly well to closer inspection. Just as ready-to-build options make it possible for someone with no woodworking or cabinetry skills[3] to self-serve their own furniture, DIY BI tools[4] like Power BI make it increasingly easy for someone with no data preparation or data modeling skills to build their own BI solutions.

To step away from the furniture analogy, tools like Power BI simplify the solution domain and make it easy for problem domain experts to solve their own problems without needing to become true experts in the solution domain.

Any finance or supply chain professional can use Power BI Desktop to build reports that do what they need, without needing to ask for help. Their reports may not be the most beautiful or best optimized[5],  but maybe they don’t need to be. Maybe “good enough” is actually good enough. Just as it might make more sense to buy a $40 Ikea bedside table instead of spending hundreds or thousands of dollars on something fancier, it might make sense to stack a few milk cartons on top of each other and call it good, at least until you can save up for something better[6]. There is no one size that fits all.

If you are a Power BI professional, it may be difficult to think of the “boards and cinderblocks bookshelf” approach as acceptable, but in most circumstances it’s not up to you to decide. The tools for DIY BI are widely and freely available, and people will use them if they present the most attractive and accessible option to solve their problems. You can’t stop them from building DIY solutions, but you can help them build better ones.

This is where having an effective and engaged center of excellence comes in. Whether you think in terms of problem and solution domains, or in terms of enabling DIY through readily available tools and guidance[7], you can help make “good enough” better by meeting your problem domain experts where they are. They have the tools they need to get started building their own solutions, but they probably need your expertise and assistance to achieve their full potential.

You should help them.


[1] Probably a Power BI practitioner, but who knows?

[2] I have repeatedly seen Power BI referred to as a “platform” which is basically the same thing as a table, so I’m going to withhold judgment on this one.

[3] Someone like me! I married a carpenter and have never found the motivation to develop these skills myself.

[4] DIY BI has a ring to it that SSBI doesn’t have. Why don’t we start using DIY BI instead. DBIY? D(B)IY? D(BI)Y? Hmmm…

[5] They may indeed be the Power BI versions of my DIY home improvement projects.

[6] Please raise your hand if you too had bookshelves made of random boards and cinderblocks when you were in college, and were also happy with the results.

[7] This is the second place in this post where I’ve shared a link to this Marketplace story. If you run a Power BI COE for your organization, do yourself a favor and listen to the story – it will inspire you to think about your COE in different ways.

Please help make Microsoft Teams more accessible

If you’re in a rush, please skip reading the post and instead vote on these two Microsoft Teams feedback items:

  1. “Please stop blinking” – requesting an option to disable the near-constant blinking of the taskbar button for the Windows app for Teams
  2. “Request User-Level Option to Disable GIF Autoplay” – this one is pretty self-explanatory

Thank you for your votes and comments!

Now on with the post…

I’ve blogged previously about the importance of diversity, including the importance of having a diverse team when building software. I’ve even posted about  specific accessibility challenges with the collaboration tool many of use every day – Microsoft Teams.

And in this context, I am requesting your help.

Last week I shared this quick Twitter poll, and over the course of a day I learned that my challenges with Teams’ default behavior – turning the taskbar button orange and blinking every time there’s activity in the app – are not just mine. Nearly 100 people responded to the poll, and over two thirds of them identified this behavior as a challenge for them as well[1].

For me, this constant flashing is like having someone scream at me all day along. If I’m having a challenging anxiety day, it’s even worse. Judging from the replies on Twitter, I’m not alone in this regard either. And because more and more functionality is being delivered via Teams, it’s not like we can simply close the app to make the blinking stop.

I’ve discovered an undocumented and unsupported hack that appears to solve this problem for some users, but it doesn’t appear to work for everyone. Also, it’s an awful hack that’s about as user-friendly as watching YouTube on your Peloton bike…

If this behavior is a problem for you, please take a few moments to vote up on this feedback item, and to add a personal comment as well. The Teams product team needs to hear from their users to understand what’s important, and this is apparently were they’re listening.

Thank you!


[1] This is a pretty vague interpretation of the poll results, so I’ve included the Twitter poll so you can keep me honest.

 

Thoughts on community

This post is mainly a story about how community has affected my career, and how it might affect yours as well. The post has been sitting in my drafts for a few months waiting for inspiration to strike. That inspiration came in this recent[0] data culture video where I talked about communities of practice inside enterprise organizations, and the ways that positive behaviors can be promoted and encouraged for these internal communities of practice – because the same patterns often apply to public communities as well.

So let’s talk about community.

No, not that Community. Technical community. Community like this:

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I started off my tech career as a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT) in 1996. I spent much of the next decade as a trainer, mentor, and consultant, but even though I was learning and growing year after year, the pace of that growth felt slow. I quickly became a medium-size fish in a tiny pond[1] and that was pretty much that. My career growth was limited in part by the company I chose to keep.

To be fair, there was an online[3] MCT community where I would often lurk and occasionally post, but I never took real advantage of it. I didn’t feel confident enough to post often, and for some reason traveling to a conference or other in-person MCT event just didn’t feel like something that was available to me – this was something that other people did, not something I could do.[4]

In late 2004 I started thinking about getting back to more training after a few years focusing on software development and consulting. I decided that the upcoming SQL Server 2005 release would be a great opportunity for making this change. Microsoft had made available to MCTs the preview versions of two “What’s new in SQL Server 2005” courses – one for developers and one for admins – and I was going to get certified to teach these courses as soon as they were available to offer. I’d been working with SQL Server since version 6.5, and much of my consulting work included developing solutions on SQL Server 2000, so this was a logical direction that matched my experience, skills, and interest.

To make a long story slightly less long – and because I’ve shared some of the details while this post was sitting in my drafts – that focus on SQL Server 2005 was my jumping off point to become an active member of the MCT and SQL Server communities. I was still doing many of the same things I’d been doing all along, but now I was doing them where more people could benefit, and where more people could see me doing what I did. And people noticed.

People noticed that I knew what I was talking about on technical topics, but mainly people noticed that I engaged in a constructive and helpful manner. That I gave more than I took.[5]

And this brings us to the concept of visibility from that earlier blog post, and the opportunity that comes from being seen kicking ass – being seen doing the great work you do every day. For me, being actively engaged in the MCT community led to my first job at Microsoft. People who knew me because of my community involvement let me know that there was a job I should apply for, and they put a referral into the internal HR systems to make it more likely I would get called for an interview[6], and the rest is history.

For you, being actively engaged in your community – whether it’s the Power BI community or something else – will likely mean something very similar. The details will be different because the context is different, but adding your voice to the communities you frequent is how you let the community know who you are and what you do.

When you answer questions – and when you ask them too – other members of the community will begin to understand what you do, and how you work. When you write a blog post or record a video, more people will begin to understand how you think, and how you communicate. They’ll learn from you, and they’ll learn about you.

This is good.

As more people learn about who you are and what you do, and as more people begin to see and value your contributions, they’ll start thinking about how awesome it would be if you could contribute more directly to their projects and products. For me this meant being asked more frequently to teach SQL Server and SSIS classes, and an increased volume of inquiries about consulting availability.[7] I had more opportunities for more interesting and better paying work because of my engagement with the community, and it changed my life for the better in many ways.

For you it will look different because the context is different, but you can follow the same pattern. Your contributions to the community organically become your resume[8], your marketing web site, your demo reel. Potential employers and potential clients[9] will have a more complete picture of how you work than a job interview can provide, and that can make all the difference.

Implied in this pattern is the positive nature of your community contributions. If you’re a bully or a gatekeeper or engage in other types of abusive behavior… people notice that too. This can become its own opportunity for improvement, because if you’re more mindful about presenting the side of you that you want people to see, the more likely you are to become that better version of yourself.[10]

Engaging with the community changed my life. It can change yours too.


Interesting side note on timing: I joined Twitter ten years ago this month.

At that time I had just accepted a position on the SQL Server Integration Services  (SSIS) product team, and had asked one of my new colleagues where the SSIS community was centered, and he pointed me there. The rest sort of took care of itself…


[0] Referring to this data culture video as “recent” gives you some insight into how long this post languished in draft form after the introduction was written.

[1] This is kind of like saying “big fish in a small pond” but self-aware enough to realize I’ve never been a large fish on any scale.[2]

[2] I am so sorry, and yet not sorry at all.

[3] Two words: Usenet newsgroups.

[4] I’ve thought about this a lot in the intervening years, and believe that the root cause was probably a combination of my rural, poor, opportunity-sparse upbringing, and my mental health challenges, but I doubt I’ll ever know for sure.

[5] I’m generalizing here, and making some big assumptions based on the available evidence. This is what I think people noticed based on the way that they reacted, but only a handful said so. Of course, they typically said so when offering me work…

[6] This is something I have done a few times over the years myself, and there’s no better feeling than knowing I played some small part in helping Microsoft attract new talent, and in helping a member of the community achieve their career goals.

[7] For me it also meant that I roughly doubled my billing rate over the course of 18 months. I had so many inquiries that I was turning down almost all of them because I didn’t have the bandwidth to say yes, and decided to take advantage of the laws of supply and demand.

[8] This 2016-era post from MVP Brent Ozar presents a much more prescriptive approach to this theme.

[9] And potential employees as well, in the fullness of time.

[10] And let’s be honest – if you’re an insufferable asshole who refuses to change, participating in a community is a great way to let people know, so they can know that you’re someone they should avoid hiring, interviewing, or contracting. This is also good.

A hat full of of dataflows knowledge

Life and work have been getting the best of me this month, and I haven’t found the time[1] to keep up on blogging and video now that my series on building a data culture has wrapped up. I’ve been watching the dataflows and Power Query teams releasing all sorts of exciting new capabilities, and realizing that I’m not going to be writing about them in a timely manner.

Thankfully Laura Graham-Brown is picking up the slack – and then some.

Laura is a Microsoft MVP whose “Hat Full of Data” blog has become one of my favorite morning reads, and whose YouTube channel seems to include all of the videos I’ve been thinking about making, but not actually finding the time to make them.

Like this one on the new Power Query Online diagram view that is now available in public preview for dataflows in Power BI:

If you’ve been waiting for new dataflows content, you should definitely head over to Laura’s blog today to check out the awesome work she’s been doing.

I hope to be writing more regularly in December after my work-related “crunch mode” has passed, but if 2020 has taught me anything[2] it’s that I have no idea what’s waiting around the corner. In the meantime, you should follow Laura, because she’s doing awesome work.


[1] Or the spare creative mental energies, which seem to be in sparser supply than spare minutes and hours.

[2] If 2020 has taught me anything, it’s that 2020 has taught me nothing.

Data Culture: Community champions

What would an epic battle be without champions?

Lost. The epic battle would be lost without champions.

Don’t let this happen to you battle to build a data culture. Instead, find your champions, recognize and thank them, and give them the tools they need to rally their forces and lead them to victory.

Let’s do this!!

Despite what the nice short video[1] may lead you to believe, it’s not absolutely necessary to provide your data culture champions with literal swords[2]. But it is vital that you arm[3] them with the resources and connections they need to be successful.

In any community there will be people who step up to go the extra mile, to learn more than they need to know, and to do more than they are asked. These people are your champions, but they can’t do it all on their own. In the long term champions will succeed or fail based on the support they get from the center of excellence.

With support from the BI COE, champions can help a small central team scale their reach and impact. Champions typically become the primary point of contact for their teams and business groups, sharing information and answering questions. They demonstrate the art of the possible, and put technical concepts into the context and language that their business peers understand.

This is just what they do – this is what makes them champions.

An organization that’s actively working to build a data culture will recognize and support these activities. And if an organization does not…


[1] This video is about 1/3 as long as the last video in the series. You’re very welcome.

[2] But why take chances, am I right?

[3] See what I did there? I shouldn’t be allowed to write blog posts this close to bedtime.

Data Culture: Showcasing the Art of the Possible

The last post and video in this series looked at the broad topic of training. This post looks at as specific aspect of this topic: letting people know what is possible, and sparking their imagination to do amazing things.

A lot of content and training materials will focus on capabilities: here is a feature, this is what it does, and this is how you use it. Although this type of content is important, it isn’t enough on its own to accelerate the growth of a data culture.

The most successful organizations I’ve worked with have included in their community of practice content specifically targeting the art of the possible. This might be a monthly presentation by community champions across the business. It might be someone from the center of excellence highlighting new features, or the integration between features and tools. The most important thing is planting the seed of an idea in the minds of people who will say “I had no idea you could do that!”

My colleagues Miguel and Chris are some of my greatest personal sources of inspiration for building reports[1] because each of them does amazing things with Power BI that make it powerful, usable, and beautiful – but they’re just two of the many people out there showing me new techniques and possibilities.

Who will you inspire today?


[1] And by now you probably realize that I need all the inspiration I can get for anything related to data visualization.

Data Culture: Training for the Community of Practice

The last few posts and videos in this series have introduced the importance of a community where your data culture can grow, and ways to help motivate members of the community, so your data culture can thrive.

But what about training? How do we give people the skills, knowledge, and guidance that they need before they are able do work with data and participate in the data culture you need them to help build?

Training is a key aspect of any successful data culture, but it isn’t always recognized as a priority. In fact the opposite is often true.

I’ve worked in tech long enough, and have spent enough of that time close to training to know that training budgets are often among the first things cut during an economic downturn. These short-term savings often produce long-term costs that could be avoided, and more mature organizations are beginning to realize this.

In my conversations with enterprise Power BI customers this year, I’ve noticed a trend emerging. When I ask how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting how they work with data, I hear “we’re accelerating our efforts around self-service BI and building a data culture because we know this is now more important than ever” a lot more than I hear “we’re cutting back on training to save money.” There’s also a clear correlation between the maturity of the organizations I’m talking with and the response I get. Successful data cultures understand the value of training.

I’ll let the video speak for itself, but I do want to call out a few key points:

  1. Training on tools is necessary, but it isn’t enough. Your users need to know how to use Power BI[1], but they also need to know how to follow organizational processes and work with organizational data sources.
  2. Training material should be located as close as possible to where learners are already working – the people who need it the most will not go out of their way to look for it or to change their daily habits.
  3. There is a wealth of free Power BI training available from Microsoft (link | link | link) as well as a broad ecosystem of free and paid training from partners.

The most successful customers I work with use all of the resources that are available. Typically they will develop internal online training courses that include links to Microsoft-developed training material, Microsoft product documentation, and community-developed content, in a format and structure[2] that they develop and maintain themselves, based on their understanding of the specific needs of their data culture.

Start as small as necessary, listen and grow, and iterate as necessary. There’s no time like the present.


[1] Or whatever your self-service BI tool of choice may be – if you’re reading this blog, odds are it’s Power BI.

[2] I’m tempted to use the term “curriculum” here, but this carries extra baggage that I don’t want to include. Your training solution can be simple or complex and still be successful – a lot of this will depend on your company culture, and the needs of the learners you’re targeting.

Representation and visibility

tl;dr: We need more representation in tech, in part because career opportunities come from kicking ass where people can see you, and that comes from knowing that you belong, and that knowing comes from seeing people like you already belonging.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Representation is a complex topic. Being a straight, white, cisgender, American man, I don’t have a lot of personal experiences with the lack of representation. But I do have one, and it involves swords.

Back in 2004 a friend of mine sent me a copy of the first edition of The Swordsman’s Companion by Guy Windsor. At this  point I had no idea that people were recreating medieval martial arts and fighting with steel weapons[1], so I read through the book and eventually sold it at a yard sale. I was interesting, and I loved the idea of being able to do what the people in the book were doing, but deep inside I knew that people like me didn’t actually do things like that. I was wrong, of course, but at the time the totality of my life experience told me I was right, and I simply didn’t question this knowledge.[2] Ten years passed before this opportunity presented itself again – ten years in which I could have been studying, practicing, competing, improving.

Now take this almost-trivial example and apply it to your career. What if you had never seen someone like yourself in a job role? How would you know that this was something that you could do, that this was a path that was open for you to travel?

When I look back on my career in IT, I can see tipping points – places where everything changed, and my life was forever improved. All but one of them (we’ll come back to this one) happened because someone saw me kicking ass and said “I want you to come kick ass with me.”

  • In 1996 when Dave saw me excelling as an applications trainer and offered me the opportunity to become a technical trainer and MCT.
  • In 1997 when Jeff saw me teaching Windows NT networking and offered me a job with a much higher salary and responsibilities that included consulting and application development.
  • In 2003 when Carolyn offered me a full-time contract as I was leaving my then-collapsing employer and starting my own consultancy, and when I simply didn’t know how I would pay my mortgage in six months, or pay the hospital bills for my impending second child.
  • In 2005 when Corey saw me teaching a beta SQL Server 2005 course, and said “you need to come work at TechEd this year.”
  • In 2007 when I quoted Ted almost double my then-standard daily rate to get him to quit nagging me about working for him, and he instantly agreed and asked how soon I could start.
  • In 2008 when Ken and Dave told Shakil that I was the only person who could do the job he needed done, and he ended up offering me my first job at Microsoft.
  • In 2011 when Matt learned I was looking for a new role and said “we have an open PM position on the SSIS team – let me introduce you to the hiring manager so you can see if you want to apply.”
  • In 2017 when Kasper kept subtly mentioning how much he loved the team he was on, until I finally figured out he wanted me to join it.

This is my story, and I’m including names both to say “thank you” and to make it real – these are the people who enabled me to be who I am today, where I am today, doing what I love so much today. I’ve heard variations on this story from many of my colleagues and peers, but this one is mine.

Please don’t get me wrong – I don’t believe anyone was giving me any handouts. At every step along the way I was doing the work – I was working hard, pushing, trying, struggling to kick as much ass as I possibly could. I was really good, because I had studied and practiced and put in the long hours to learn and improve – but without these people seeing and recognizing my hard work, the opportunities simply would not have existed for me. At any of these tipping points, if I hadn’t been where these people could see me, the moment would have passed, and the opportunity would have been lost. Each opportunity was dependent on the opportunities that came before it – each one depended on my being where I was, being visible and being seen.

This brings me back to that very first tipping point. In 1996 I saw a classified ad[3] for a job teaching people how to use Microsoft Windows and Office, and I applied for it.

And this brings us back to representation.

I applied for that first job because I could see myself in the role – I knew that I could do it. I had no difficulty picturing my 20-something Christian white male self in that role, and neither did the folks doing the hiring.[4]

But what if I was female, or Black, or transgender? What if I looked at an industry that was overwhelmingly male and overwhelmingly white and overwhelmingly cis, and knew that I didn’t belong, because there was no one like me doing things like that? Would I have opened that very first door, on which every later door depended?

I can’t answer that, but looking at the still-white and still-male faces around me every day in tech, I have every reason to believe that many candidates would see this lack of representation and infer from it a lack of opportunity – and never take that first step. And for those who do take the first steps I only need to look around to see the barriers that the tech industry put in place for women and minorities, letting them know every day that they’re not welcome.

Back in July I shared a post that referenced an amazing webcast by UX Designer Jasmine Orange on “Designing for the Ten Percent.” In that post the link was buried in a footnote, so I want to call it out here explicitly – if you made it this far into my post, you really want to watch this webcast. Jasmine’s premise[5] is that by designing for underrepresented users/communities/audiences/people you end up making better products for everyone.

I believe the same is true of tech in general – by building organizations, teams, and cultures that are welcoming to people who have been traditionally excluded, we build organizations, teams, and cultures that are better and more welcoming for people who have never been excluded. Diverse teams are stronger, more resilient, more agile, and more productive. Diverse cultures thrive and grow where monocultures collapse and die.

Why do I care? Does any of this even affect me directly?

Yes, it does.

On one hand, being part of a diverse team means that I will be more likely to be part of a successful team, with the financial rewards that come with success. On the other hand, I feel more welcome and more at home as part of a diverse team.

Still, it’s not about me, is it?

If you’re considering a role in tech and you’re not sure if you should apply for a job, do it. Even if you don’t feel like you’re a perfect fit, or don’t believe you meet every single requirement in the job posting. The white guys are going to apply because they know they below. You belong too, even if you don’t know it yet.

If you’re coming into tech from an underrepresented minority, you not only belong, you’re vitally needed. You bring something that no one else can bring – your background, your experiences, your perspectives – all the lessons you learned the hard way that an all-male, all-white team might pay an expensive consultant to tell them about after they’ve failed enough times.

Not every employer will recognize this value, but that doesn’t mean it’s not there, or that it’s not real. Some employers will judge every candidate against the “tech bro ideal” and will try to make every hire fit into this mold.

If you’re an employer, don’t be this guy. If you’re an employer, recognize the strategic value of having a diverse team. And recognize that this diverse team won’t happen on its own. Support organizations like Black Girls Code, because this is where your hiring pipeline will come from. Value the diverse perspectives that are already represented on your team, and promote them. Give authority and power to people who will hire diverse candidates. Give authority and power to people who look like the people you’re trying to recruit.

And if you’re working in tech today, please be be the person who notices. When you see someone kicking ass – doing an amazing job and demonstrating talent and potential to do more – be the person who says something. Even if you can’t see yourself in that person. Even if they don’t look like you and the rest of your team.

Representation is important, because it helps more people know that they can open that first door. Visibility is important, because it provides the opportunity for change and growth – visibility is what opens the second door, and the third, and….

Ok…

I started off writing a completely different post, but this is the one that wanted to come out today. At some point in the next few weeks[6] I’ll follow up with a post on community and how community is a key technique for increasing your visibility, but this post has gotten long enough, and then some.

Thanks for sticking with me – I’d love to hear what you think.


[1] I learned in 2014 when I first saw this video and fell in love.

[2] Underlying this false knowledge was likely the experience of growing up rural and poor, and not having a lot of opportunities as a child, or many experiences as an adult. It wasn’t until 2005 when I first travelled to Europe for a Manowar concert that my mindset started to change, but that’s probably not relevant to this post.

[3] Classified ads are what we called Craigslist before it was LinkedIn. Something like that.

[4] At this point I feel compelled to mention my friend Kathy, who actually got the job I applied for. I didn’t get the job, so I ended up taking a job as a bank teller. When the training center had another opening a few weeks later they called me back to ask if I was still available, and I said yes. True story. Hi Kathy!

[5] More accurately, this is my interpretation of Jasmine’s premise.

[6] LOL @ me, and LOL @ you if you haven’t learned by now not to trust any predictions of future output on my part. We should both know better by now.