Webcast: Unleashing Your Personal Superpower

Last week I delivered a presentation for the Data Platform Women In Tech‘s Mental Health and Wellness Day event.

The recording for my “Unleashing Your Personal Superpower” session is now online:

I hope you’ll watch the recording[1], but here’s a summary just in case:

  • Growth often results from challenge
  • Mental health issues like anxiety and depression present real challenges that can produce “superpowers” – skills that most people don’t have, and which can grow from the day-to-day experience of living with constant challenge
  • Recognizing and using these “superpowers” isn’t always easy – you need to be honest with yourself and the people around you, which in turn depends on being in a place of trust and safety to do so

In the presentation I mainly use an X-Men metaphor, and suggest that my personal superpowers are:

  1. Fear: Most social interactions[2] are deeply stressful for me, so to compensate I over-prepare and take effective notes for things I need to remember or actions I need to take
  2. Confusion: I don’t really understand how other people’s brains work, or the relationship between my actions and their reactions – to compensate I have developed techniques for effective written and verbal communication to eliminate ambiguity and drive clarity
  3. Chaos: My mind is made of chaos[3], which causes all sorts of challenges – to compensate I have developed a “process reflex” to understand complex problems and implement processes to address or mitigate them

I wrap up the session with a quick mention of the little-known years before Superman joined the Justice League, which he spent as a Kryptonite delivery guy, and absolutely hated his life. Once he found a team where he could use his strengths and not need to always fight to overcome his weaknesses, he was much happier and effective.

In related news, if I could only get these Swedes to return my calls, I’m thinking of forming a new superhero team…


[1] And the rest of the session recordings, because it was a great event.

[2] Think “work meetings” for starters and “work social events” for an absolute horror show.

[3] I have a draft blog post from two years ago that tries to express this, but I doubt I will ever actually finish and publish it…

T-Minus One Week Until MBAS 2021!

The 2021 Microsoft Business Applications Summit (MBAS) starts next week on Tuesday May 4th.[1] This year MBAS is a free online event, so if you’re not already registered please register right now – this blog post can wait.

Ok, now that you’re registered, let me tell you why I’m so excited about MBAS this year. The main reason for my excitement is these featured sessions:

Power BI (Peek into the future Part 1): Vision & Roadmap

Power BI (Peek into the future Part 2): Analytics for everyone

Power BI Announcement

The first two “peek into the future” sessions are all about the Power BI roadmap – how Power BI has grown, and how it will continue to grow in the months ahead.

The final “announcement” session… we’re not talking about yet. The session page says “We have a new feature launching that we can’t wait to tell you about” but we are going to have to wait until we get approval to publicly discuss this important new capability. I shouldn’t say any more, but this feels like A Big Deal™.

The next reason I’m so excited is because of the 12 or so “Real-world stories with Power BI” sessions you’ll find in the full Power BI session list. These sessions are led by my amazing teammate Lauren, who is working with Power BI customer organizations around the world to help showcase their successes, and the awesome work their teams have done using Power BI, Azure, and Microsoft 365.

Even though the “big news from Microsoft” sessions get most of the excitement at Microsoft conferences, these “what real customers are doing in the real world” sessions are the hidden gems of MBAS.

These sessions are an amazing opportunity to look behind the scenes of other organizations to see how they’re solving problems – what tools they use, how they use them, how they structure their teams, how they scope and deliver and evolve their solutions. This type of “strategic story” can be incredibly valuable for decision makers, architects, and other senior technical stakeholders, and represent the type of insights that are often difficult to obtain unless you have personal connections with peers inside those other organizations.

No matter what excites you the most, please register for MBAS today, and please spread the word!


[1] Please pause for a moment to appreciate the effort I’ve taken to keep this post free of Star Wars references. You’re welcome.

Upcoming webcast: Unleashing your personal superpower

This damned pandemic[1] has been getting the best of me, but Talking About Mental Health is Important, and it’s more important now than ever. So when I learned that the Data Platform Women in Tech user group was hosting a free day-long online event focused on mental health and wellness, I knew I wanted to participate.

Today I am excited to announce that I will be presenting on “Unleashing your personal superpower” on Friday May 7th:

Building a successful career in tech is hard. Every day is a battle, and sometimes the barriers placed in your way seem insurmountable. Wouldn’t it all be easier if you had a superpower?

Maybe you do.

Greta Thunberg famously described her Asperger’s syndrome diagnosis as being a superpower: “I’m sometimes a bit different from the norm. And – given the right circumstances- being different is a superpower.” We can all learn something from Greta.

In this informal session, Microsoft program manager Matthew Roche will share his personal story – including the hard, painful parts he doesn’t usually talk about. Matthew will share his struggles with mental health, how he found his own superpower, how he tries to use it to make the world a better place… and how you might be able to do the same.

Please join the session, and join the conversation, because talking about mental health is important, and because the first step to finding your superpower is knowing where to look.

You can learn more about the event here, and you can sign up here.

I hope you’ll join me!


[1] Of course it’s more than just the damned pandemic, but when I first typed “this year” I realized this year has been going on for decades now, and I figured I would just roll with it because finding the perfect phrase wasn’t really important to the webcast announcement and anyway I expect things will probably suck indefinitely and isn’t this what run-on sentences in footnotes are for, anyway?

Data Culture Presentation Resources

On Thursday, December 10th I joined the Glasgow Data User Group for their December festivities. Please don’t tell anyone[1] but I’ll be bringing the gift of data culture!

The session recording is now available on YouTube:

If you’re interested, you can also download my session slides here: Glasgow Data UG – Building a Data Culture with Power BI.


[1] I want it to be a surprise! Also this footnote makes even less sense now that the session is in the past…

“Why dataflows?” webcast recording now online

A lot of the questions I get about dataflows in Power BI boil down to the simplest[1] question: “Why dataflows?”

On Saturday November 7 I joined MVP Reid Havens for a YouTube live stream where we looked at this question and a bunch of other awesome dataflow questions from the 60+ folks who joined us.

The stream recording is now available for on-demand viewing. You should check it out!


[1] And therefore most difficult to answer concisely. That’s just how it goes.

Session resources: Patterns for adopting dataflows in Power BI

This morning I presented a new webinar for the Istanbul Power BI user group, covering one of my favorite subjects: common patterns for successfully using and adopting dataflows in Power BI.

This session represents an intersection of my data culture series in that it presents lessons learned from successful enterprise customers, and my dataflows series in that… in that it’s about dataflows. I probably didn’t need to point out that part.

The session slides can be downloaded here: 2020-09-23 – Power BI Istanbul – Patterns for adopting dataflows in Power BI

The session recording is available for on-demand viewing. The presentation is around 50 minutes, with about 30 minutes of dataflows-centric Q&A at the end. Please check it out, and share it with your friends!

 

Webcast: Patterns for adopting dataflows in Power BI

I haven’t been posting a lot about dataflows in recent months, but that doesn’t mean I love them any less. On Wednesday September 23rd, I’ll be sharing some of that love via a free webcast hosted by the Istanbul Power BI user group[1]. You can sign up here.

In this webcast I’ll be presenting practices for successfully incorporating dataflows into Power BI applications, based on my experience working with enterprise Power BI customers. If you’re interested in common patterns for success, common challenges to avoid, and answers to the most frequently asked dataflows questions, please sign up today.

This webcast won’t cover dataflows basics, so if you’re new to dataflows in Power BI or just need a refresher, please watch this tutorial before joining!


[1] In case it needs to be said, yes, the session will be delivered in English.

Thoughts on effective communication

Early in my career I worked with an incredible network engineer. This was back when networking was a bigger part of my job, and I learned a lot from him[1]. But he was not an effective communicator. Any time we were in a meeting and he was presenting a topic I cared about, I needed to stand up, get closer to the front of the room, and focus exclusively on what he was saying, forcing myself to pay attention.

Because he just shared facts.

Page after page, slide after slide, minute after agonizing hour of facts.

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This was before I knew about the value of asking questions, so I took the burden on myself, because I cared. Most people who could have gotten value from his expertise simply tuned out, or fell asleep[2].

Although this colleague of days gone by will always stand out as the exemplar of ineffective communication, I still see people every day who communicate by sharing facts without context, and without taking their audience into consideration.

Here are a bunch of things that I know and now you know them too!

Yeah, nah. When communication is simply a dump of facts, an opportunity is lost.

If you find yourself falling into this pattern of communication, please pause and ask yourself these questions:

  1. Who is my audience?
  2. What is my goal for communicating with this audience?
  3. What does my audience care about in general – what motivates them?
  4. Why will my audience care about what I am telling them?
  5. How will my communication motivate my audience to take action to meet my goal?

Or, as a colleague summed it up nicely in a chat:

“Target audience and value proposition. FFS.”[3]

You may be looking at these questions and thinking “that sounds like a lot of work.” I’d like to respond to that excellent-but-false thought in two ways.

First, asking yourself these questions is simply a habit to develop. It will take a little time at the beginning, but over time it becomes second nature.[4]

Second, choosing to not ask yourself these questions is like choosing the low bidder when picking a home improvement contractor. You save a little up-front, but you end up needing to re-do the work more quickly, and no one is ever happy with the results.

These questions apply to any form of communication – email, presentations and conference talks, personal  conversations, you name it.

For lower-risk, lower-value communication like a chat with a coworker you might ask yourself these questions during a conversation, as a safety check to help you keep on track. For a high-risk, high-value communication like a business review or product pitch or large presentation, you might ask yourself these questions many times over weeks or months as you define and refine the narrative you want to drive.

For the past year or so, my great-grandboss was an amazing leader named Lorraine. One of the things I loved about working with Lorraine was how she structured large-audience emails. Any time she sent out a newsletter or other message that would reach hundreds of people, she consistently included these sections at the top of the mail:

2020-08-05-10-57-47-549--OUTLOOK

  1. Big bold header so you know instantly what you’re looking at
  2. tl;dr section so you can read in 2 or 3 sentences the most important things in the mail
  3. Read this if section so you know if you’re the target audience for the mail

Every time I see one of these emails I am impressed. Lorraine is a communication wizard, guru, ninja, and I am in awe of her effortless-seeming skills.[5]

But… these effortless results probably come from years of mindful practice. As with any skill, you only get the results if you put in the effort. Why not start today?

P.S. While this post was written and waiting to be published, someone mentioned to me the Minto Pyramid Principle. I’d heard of it before, but I never actually knew what it was called, and now that I do know I’ve done some additional reading on it. The Minto Pyramid Principle is a communication tool that take a similar approach to the “know your audience” approach I’ve presented above. Unlike my random blog post, the Minto Pyramid Principle has stood the test of time – it’s been around since the 70s, and there are lots of different resources including books and articles out there to support it with training and information. You should check it out too.


[1] 20+ years later I am still reminded regularly that 90% of communication failures are caused by problems in the physical layer. Please do not throw sausage pizza away.

[2] Yes, literally fell asleep in work meetings. It was a running joke.

[3] Full disclosure: I added the FFS, not him. But it fits.

[4] Think back to when you were first learning the Farfalla di Ferro, and how you needed to think about every cut, every step, and every transition – and how today you could do it with your eyes closed.

[5] Lorraine is no longer in my reporting chain after a recent re-org, and you can be certain that I sent her a “thank you” message during the transition period. Some things are too awesome to not acknowledge explicitly.

Grandfather, tell me a story!

Are you delivering a technical presentation? Don’t tell me about capabilities.

Don’t tell me about products, or features, or tools.

Tell me a story that I can relate to[1].

2020-06-12-13-57-57-323--msedge
I promise this photo is very relevant to every technical presentation

Tell me a story about someone who struggled, and tell the story in a way that I can relate to the struggling character. When you tell me a story, you immediately have my attention, because my human brain is optimized for learning from stories[2].

Tell me a story about a problem, and the pain that problem has caused. The pain makes it real.

Now tell me about the solution. You already have my attention, and my emotional engagement. It’s time to take advantage of this fact.

Tell me about how your products, features, tools, and capabilities were used to solve the problem, and to eliminate the pain.

Why did the person choose a specific tool or feature? How did she use that capability, and what impact did it make? How did the person’s life change and improve because of the actions she took?

When you tell me a story instead of telling me about features, you probably won’t get to mention every feature you want. That’s OK.

If you tell me a story you might only be able to mention 5 or 10 features instead of the 50 or 100 features you wanted to mention. That’s OK, because I’ll remember the impact those few features made, and I’ll know how they can help me.

If you’d talked about all of the features, I probably would not have remembered any of them – unless I already had my own story and could connect the dots myself.

It’s the story that makes the message stick. I wish every technical presenter remembered this. Maybe I should tell them a story…


[1] No, no, not one of those – a real story!

[2] A quick search will yield many results that highlight the value and importance of stories for learning. This blog post presents an excellent summary.

 

Customer Stories sessions from MBAS 2019

In addition to many excellent technical sessions, last week’s Microsoft Business Applications Summit (MBAS) event also included a series of “Customer Stories” sessions that may be even more valuable.

My recent “Is self-service business intelligence a two-edged sword?” post has gotten more buzz than any of my recent technical posts. Some of this might be due to the awesome use of swords[1] and the inclusion of a presentation recording and slides, but some is also largely due to how it presents guidance for successfully implementing managed self-service BI at the scale needed by a global enterprise.

Well, if you liked that post, you’re going to love these session recordings from MBAS. These “Customer Stories” sessions are hosted by the Power BI CAT team’s leader Marc Reguera, and are presented by key technical and business stakeholders from Power BI customers around the world. Unlike my presentation that focused on general patterns and success factors, these presentations each tell a real-world story about a specific enterprise-scale Power BI implementation.

Why should you care about these customer stories? I think Sun Tzu summed it up best[2]:

Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.

Understanding how to use technology and features is a tactical necessity, but unless you have a strategic plan for using them, it’s very likely you won’t succeed in the long term. And just as any military leader will study past battles, today’s technical leaders can get great value from those who have gone before them.

If you’re part of your organization’s Power BI team, add these sessions to your schedule. You’ll thank me later.


[1] Just humor me here, please.

[2] I was also considering going with the Julius Caesar’s famous quote about his empire-wide adoption of Power BI, “Veni, vidi, vizi,” but I think the Sun Tzu quote works a little better. Do you agree?